CUPE 2099 logo with illustration of a municipal skyline

Mount Pearl municipal workers to hold rally at city hall today at 5 p.m.

creynolds Collective Bargaining

Municipal workers, members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) local 2099, will be holding a rally in front of the Mount Pearl City Hall today at 5 p.m., at the same time the mayor and councillors will be holding a city council meeting.

“We want the concessions and two-tier proposals made by the city removed from the table and we want them to bargain a fair wage adjustment. We won’t accept a collective agreement that doesn’t provide the same rights and benefits for all workers and a reasonable wage adjustment,” says Turner.

CUPE 2099 is making every effort to reach a deal and to avoid a possible strike or lockout, which could happen as early as 12:01 a.m. on Monday, July 4.

WHERE: 3 Centennial Street in Mount Pearl, NL

WHEN: Tuesday, June 28 starting at 5 p.m.

WHO:

  • Members of CUPE 2099 and President Ken Turner
  • CUPE NL President Sherry Hillier
  • Supporters from other unions including: CUPE 3034, Conception Bay South; CUPE 569, St. John’s; CUPE 1289, St. John’s; CUPE 1615, Memorial University; and others.


CUPE 2099 represents more than 200 municipal workers who work in recreation services, administration, taxation and finance, road maintenance, water and sewage, facilities maintenance, landscape maintenance, engineering, and planning.

Web banner. Images of a TV and a laptop showing a television ad. Text: Urgent action required. Stop Premier Furey’s plan to destroy our public services. Reject the Reset.

CUPE public sector workers launch TV ad in Newfoundland and Labrador

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This week, CUPE Newfoundland and Labrador launched a TV ad campaign, speaking out about the damage that will be done if Premier Andrew Furey’s plan for the economy, known as the “Big Reset”, is allowed to continue.

The TV ad is now airing on NTV and will begin on CBC on June 27. A digital campaign is also being launched, asking the public to “Reject the Reset” and stop Premier Furey’s plan to destroy our public services. A message to the premier and MHA’s can be sent via the campaign website at RejectTheResetNL.ca.

Watch the ad below. 

“As frontline providers of public services, we are worried about the damage that will be caused by Premier Furey’s plans to privatize services and sell-off provincial assets,” said Sherry Hillier, CUPE NL president. “With the premier’s plan, we’ll lose control of services, costs will rise, and quality will suffer.”

“Thousands of good jobs will be lost,” adds Hillier. “At a time when the cost of living is soaring, we need to invest in public services, not make cuts. Public services make life more affordable and more equal for everyone.”

“We’re also alarmed about the creation of one provincial ‘superboard’ health authority and the impact that it will have on patients, staff, and quality of care. We’ve seen it happen it Nova Scotia and it’s a disaster,” says Hillier.

“Our government needs to act quickly to protect our public health care system and ensure that every resident of Newfoundland and Labrador has access to quality care, when and where they need it. With the premier’s plan, hospitals and clinics in rural areas will be lost. Decisions about health care services will be based on profit margins. Also, Furey’s plan means parents will have less of a say in their children’s education,” says Hillier. “We must act now and ‘reject the reset’.”


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Photo of meeting of the NL Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG) in a boardroom

Municipal sector CUPE locals unite to discuss bargaining strategies

creynolds Collective Bargaining, Political Action

Members from several CUPE locals in Newfoundland and Labrador met on the evening of May 18, 2022, to convene the CUPE NL Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG).

Photo of meeting of the NL Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG) in a boardroomFormed in 2006 and re-activated at the meeting held Wednesday, the group discussed ways of building solidarity by encouraging new and inactive locals to participate in the group as well.

CUPE national servicing representatives and CUPE NL President Sherry Hillier facilitated the discussion with municipal local executives, focusing primarily on the challenges with employers’ current bargaining trends and participation in CUPE’s provincial Reject the Reset campaign.

The collective agreements for CUPE locals 569, 1289, 2099 and 5459 all expire on June 30, 2022.

Participating locals include:

CUPE 569 St. John’s (outside workers)
CUPE 1289 St. John’s (inside workers)
CUPE 1349 Town of Grand Falls-Windsor
CUPE 2099 City of Mount Pearl
CUPE 3034 Town of Conception Bay South
CUPE 5459 St. John’s Sports and Entertainment Ltd.

The CUPE Newfoundland and Labrador Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG) represents approximately 1,800 members working in the municipal sector as heavy equipment operators, recreation workers, city inspectors, planners, taxation, administration, and many other job classifications.

Photo a large screen in a boardroom with five people participating in a conference call for the NL Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG)

Photo of meeting of the NL Municipal Occupational Group (NLMOG) in a boardroom

Committee

Apply to be on a CUPE NL standing committee

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CommitteeBecome a member of one of CUPE NL’s standing committees!

  • Contracting Out and Privatization Committee
  • Human Rights Committee
  • Global Justice Committee
  • Occupational Health and Safety Committee
  • Pensions Committee

The term of each committee is one year, beginning immediately and ending at the 2023 division convention.

How to apply

If you would like to serve on any of these division committees, please apply by sending an email to Sherry Hillier at sherryh@cupe.ca and include the following information: your name, local number, and name of the committee you are applying for.

 

Photo of Mount Pearl city hall, with CUPE NL logo superimposed

Municipal workers file for conciliation in contract negotiations with City of Mount Pearl

creynolds Collective Bargaining

Photo of Mount Pearl city hallNegotiations between municipal workers represented by the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) 2099 and the City of Mount Pearl have reached an impasse, and the union filed a request yesterday for the assistance of a conciliation officer with the Newfoundland and Labrador Labour Board.

“Talks have reached a stand still because the employer is demanding major concessions in the contract and there has been very little movement on many issues,” says CUPE 2099 President Ken Turner.

This round of bargaining began March 22, 2022. The two sides have met 12 times to negotiate since then.

“They have proposed language that would change the fundamental meaning of our collective agreement which would adversely affect the rights of all our workers, they’re attacking our benefits, which were fairly negotiated in previous rounds of bargaining, and they’re offering a very small wage increase that will not even come close to offsetting the high increase in the cost of living these days,” says Turner. “Anything less than a wage increase that keeps up with the cost of living means real wage cuts for our members. That’s unacceptable and no way to treat the hardworking people who keep this city running.”

“Hopefully, a conciliation officer will help move things forward to reach a fair and reasonable collective agreement.”

The current agreement between CUPE 2099 and the City of Mount Pearl will expire June 30, 2022.

CUPE 2099 represents approximately 200 municipal workers who work in recreation services, administration, taxation and finance, road maintenance, water and sewage, facilities maintenance, landscape maintenance, engineering, and planning.

Photo of the NL division executive newly elected on May 4, 2022

Election results: 2022 CUPE NL Division Executive

creynolds Uncategorized

On May 4, elections were held for the Division Executive Board at the CUPE NL Division Convention. Here are the members of the newly elected division executive.

Results

President
Sherry Hillier – acclaimed

Vice-President
Ernest Green – acclaimed

Secretary-Treasurer
Mike Tobin – acclaimed

Recording Secretary
Theresa Gillam – acclaimed

Executive Officer
Ken Turner

Executive Officer
Natalie Webber

Trustee
Suzanne Hiron


Previously elected trustees:

Eileen Morgan
Stacey Lucas


Executive Officer
Vacant position

Photo of the NL division executive newly elected on May 4, 2022

 

 

Web banner. Text: Seven takeaways for CUPE members, provincial budget, reject the reset

Seven takeaways for CUPE members: Budget 2022-2023

creynolds Political Action

Web banner. Text: Seven takeaways for CUPE members, reject the reset

Some of the biggest issues that we may face this year were not revealed in the specifics of the 2022-2023 provincial budget. The Furey government tailored their budget to try to pass it off as a good news story. CUPE members should be aware of these seven takeaways.

Download a printable copy of this leaflet.


  1. Centralization of health authorities into one provincial health authority
  • Centralization will not save valuable health dollars for health care, nor will it result in better care.
  • In Nova Scotia and Manitoba where centralization has been attempted, the outcome has been bad for local and rural health needs.
  1. The budget makes real cuts to program spending
  • For most departments, such as health and social services, the amount of program spending was frozen at the 2021-2022 level.
  • The Consumer Price Index rose 3.7% last year, so freezing funding to departments really means that they are getting only 96.3% of what they got last year. In real terms, that’s a cut.
  • The Furey government is planning freezes (cuts) every year until 2026-2027.
  • A few departments did receive funding to keep up with inflation. K-12 education received a 3.8% increase, so it’s one of the only departments to undergo a true “freeze”.
  • The premier’s office got a big increase, receiving 10% additional funding
  1. The Furey government is intentionally predicting less revenue this year
  • The government has projected the average price of oil for the year to be 25% less than what most banks are predicting.
  • If the price of oil keeps up as predicted, it could mean the province will get more than $200 million in royalties.
  • There is money in the budget to pay for real wage increases for public sector workers – the Furey government is just trying to hide it.
  1. Government spending on public sector salaries and benefits fell by 17% since 2015
  • The 2015-2016 budget for salaries and employee benefits was $3.5 billion (in 2015 dollars).
  • The 2022-2024 budget for salaries and employee benefits also allocates $3.5 billion (in 2022 dollars).
  • In seven years, even though the dollar figure has remained the same, $3.5 billion is worth 17% less today because of inflation.
  • It’s simple: public sector workers’ salaries and benefits have not caused a “fiscal crisis”. The crisis is that workers’ salaries and benefits have been cut by so much.
  1. Furey’s plan to privatize publicly owned assets is a bad idea
  • The budget lists three Crown corporations (Atlantic Lottery Corporation, Nalcor Energy, and NL Liquor) as contributing $497 million to government coffers last year.
  • Over the coming year, the amount that these three Crown corporations are expected to contribute is nearly double last year and could bring in $914 million.
  • Why would anyone think selling-off and privatizing publicly owned assets is a good idea?
  1. Balanced budget legislation is bad public policy
  • Balanced budget legislation could freeze growth of public sector employment, freeze wages and benefits, and cut public services and employment during an economic downturn.
  • CUPE is watching closely with our allies in the NL Federation of Labour to see if such legislation would attempt to limit or withdraw collective bargaining rights.
  • This legislation is a “political tool” to pretend to tie the hands of the current and/or future governments – but like any legislation passed by the House of Assembly, it can be overturned by a majority vote.
  1. Privatization and centralization of public services
  • The budget mentions the PERT Report, the Review of Provincial Assets (Rothschild Bank Report), and the NL Health Accord.
  • All these reports are political tools the Furey government is using to soften up Newfoundlanders and Labradorians to believe that there is no alternative to cutting services and selling our public assets to the highest, most well-connected bidder.

Download a printable copy of this leaflet.

Web banner. Text: Become a member-mobilizer! Training workshops: May 12-13 St. John's; May 16-17, Corner Brook; May 18-19, Grand Falls-Windsor

CUPE member-mobilizer training workshops taking place May 12 to 19

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May 12 and 13
CUPE Area Office, St. John’s

May 16 and 17
Greenwood Inn, Corner Brook

May 18 and 19
Mount Peyton Hotel, Grand Falls-Windsor


Premier Andrew Furey’s “Big Reset” report contains recommendations that cause for concern for all workers, both public and private sector. Privatization and the selloff of public assets will impact all CUPE members and their communities.

CUPE NL is fighting back against with our “Reject the Reset” campaign and will be holding member-mobilizer training workshops. The 1.5-day workshop is intended to equip participants with information about the Furey government’s agenda and why we need to “Reject the Reset”. It will also provide strategies to reach all CUPE members by engaging in one-on-one conversations. 

An ideal member-mobilizer would have some of the following attributes: well-respected by coworkers, strong union principles, and good communication skills.

If you or other members of your local are interested in becoming a member-mobilizer, please register for one of the three training workshops by contacting: 

Melody Voykin 
mvoykin@cupe.ca
709-753-0032

CUPE will cover lost wages, per diems, travel and accommodations (if required).


Download a copy of the workshop announcement.

Web banner. Headline: Nursing Week 2022. Text: Thank you to all licensed practical nurses and personal care attendants. Exceptional people, exceptional care. Image: illustration of three nurses.

Celebrating Nursing Week 2022

creynolds Article

Photo of front and back cover of the NL Herald magazine, with a Nursing Week ad by CUPE NLNational Nursing Week takes place May 9th to 15th and we are celebrating the incredible work of our members across the province, including licensed practical nurses (LPN) and personal care attendants (PCA).

Their dedication should be celebrated every day, but especially now while we’re experiencing a health care staffing crisis and during the pandemic.

As always, CUPE Newfoundland and Labrador will continue to fight for better compensation and working conditions for our members, and against privatization of our “public” health care.

To celebrate, CUPE NL is running a radio ad province-wide on stations including VOCM, Big Land FM, HITS FM, K-ROCK,  KIXX Country, as well as Valley Radio in Grand Falls-Windsor.

Also, a print ad can be seen on the back cover of the NL Herald.

Listen to the radio ad

 

 

Analysis of Newfoundland and Labrador Budget 2022

creynolds Economy, Mobilization, Political Action

Web banner. Text: Reject the Reset. Image: Illustration of a boot print with the CUPE NL logo.Things can change a lot in one year.

Newfoundland and Labrador’s fiscal situation has improved significantly since May 2021. The doomsayers, who a year ago beat the drum of bankruptcy, were not very good predictors of the future.

  • The deficit was less than half of what was predicted in the 2021-2022 budget ($826 million to $400 million).
  • NL debt to GDP fell back in line with pre-pandemic levels (similar to the 2015-2019 period, an approximate level of 43%).

On the surface, the budget appears to not make any cuts this year. The CBC reported on the budget in this way: “NL is reporting a brightening financial picture in a stay-the-course budget that doesn’t follow through on previously planned spending reductions.” However, that’s only half the story.

Funding for programs and services did not keep up with inflation for the most part.

The outcome is a real cut to health care and social services

  • The government continues to focus on cuts and has maintained that it will eliminate the deficit by 2026-2027.
  • To do that, it will continue to freeze and reduce expenditures on health, education, and social services, so that spending in 2026-2027 will be lower than it is in 2022-2023.
  • Important for provincial bargaining coming up, the budget does not set aside money and plan for “real wage increases” in this round of negotiations.

Bottom line

The government has hidden some money away (by underpredicting oil revenues) to make a surprise budget surplus quite likely.

The austerity threat hasn’t passed. According to its projections, the government is just postponing bigger cuts to 2023-2024, and later years of its mandate. Our goal remains the same: to knock them off that course.


Seven takeaways for CUPE members

  1. Amalgamation of health authorities into one provincial “superboard” health authority
  • The Health Accord and the PERT report recommended moving to one health authority. The budget confirmed this by announcing it as a priority for the next year.
  • Amalgamation will not save valuable health dollars for health care, nor will it result in better care for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.
  • In other provinces where it has been enacted, most recently in Nova Scotia and Manitoba, the outcome has been less attention to rural and regional needs.
  • Cape Breton used to have its own health authority, and since it lost that structure, the recruitment of doctors and local needs have been negatively affected.
  1. The budget makes real cuts to program spending
  • For most departments – health, social services – the amount of program spending was “frozen” at the 2021-2022 level. However, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) rose 3.7% last year, so freezing funding to departments really means that they are getting only 96.3% of what they got last year.
  • Therefore, the 2022-2023 budget made cuts to health care, but perhaps because people were expecting something so much worse, it came off like a good news budget.
  • These freezes quickly add up to big cuts, and the government’s plan is to do this every year until 2026-2027 to balance the budget.
  • A handful of departments did receive funding to keep up with inflation. K-12 education was a rare budget line to receive a 3.8% increase, so it was one of the only departments to undergo a true “freeze”.
  • The premier’s office received a 10% funding increase, getting a robust real increase.
  1. There is a golden egg hidden in the budget that has a good chance to hatch
  • The government has projected the average price of oil for 2022-2023 to be USD$83/barrel. At the time of writing this analysis, the price was USD$106/barrel, and most banks are predicting the price to average a bit over USD$100/barrel for the next year.
  • If the price keeps up as predicted, this may mean $205 million or more in royalties (in the 2022-2023 budget year), which provides the government with a lot of room to maneuver.
  • In a provincial bargaining scenario where the government is crying poor, it will be important to make the point that the budget has been very conservative in its estimates of oil royalties.
  1. Government spending on public sector salaries and benefits fell by 17% since 2015
  • The 2015-2016 budget allocated $3.5 billion for salaries and employee benefits in 2015 dollars.
  • The 2022-2024 budget allocates $3.5 billion for salaries and employee benefits in 2022 dollars.
  • In seven years, the dollar figure has remained the same, however, $3.5 billion is worth 17% less because of inflation.
  • It’s simple: public sector workers’ salaries and benefits have not caused a “fiscal crisis”. The crisis is that salaries and benefits have been drastically cut, when compared to increases in the cost of living.
  1. Privatization of crown corporations is a bad idea
  • The budget lists three Crown corporations (Atlantic Lottery Corporation, Nalcor Energy, and the NL Liquor Corporation) as contributing $497 million to government coffers in 2021-2022.
  • The amount that these three Crown corporations are expected to contribute to 2022-2023 budget revenues is nearly double, at $914 million.
  • Why would anyone think privatizing corporations that contribute nearly a billion dollars a year to provincial coffers is a good idea?
  1. Balanced budget legislation
  • The budget documents announce that the government intends to introduce and pass balanced budget legislation in this session of the legislature.
  • Such legislation could freeze the growth of public sector employment, freeze wage and benefit improvements, and cut public sector services and employment during an economic downturn.
  • CUPE also is watching closely, with our allies in the NL Federation of Labour, if such legislation would attempt to limit or withdraw collective bargaining rights for public sector workers.
  • This legislation is a political tool to pretend to tie the hands of the current government or future governments, but like any legislation passed by the House of Assembly, it can be overturned by a majority vote. Regardless, such legislation could still be used to do serious damage.
  1. Shoes still left to drop – privatization and centralization of services
  • The government makes mention of the PERT Report (The Big Reset), the Review of Provincial Assets Portfolio (Rothschild Bank report), and the NL Health Accord.
  • All these reports are political tools the government is using to soften up Newfoundlanders and Labradorians to believe that there is no alternative to cutting services and selling our public assets to the highest well-connected bidder.
  • Some of the biggest issues that we may face this year were not revealed in specifics in the budget. The government tailored this budget in such a way to sell it as a good news story.

Download a copy of this budget analysis (PDF)


Background

The Furey government was elected in March 2021. Since that time, Minister Coady presented the 2021-2022 Budget in May 2021, a fiscal update in November 2021, and the 2022-2023 Budget on April 7, 2021.

Over that time, the Furey government has spent a lot of time and money trying to convince people that the province is in a major crisis that can only be solved through drastic cuts, privatizations, and reorganization that will result in less say and services in rural NL.

The 2022-2023 Budget continues the government’s austerity agenda, by shrinking real government spending, regardless of its happy title of “Change is in the Air”.

What makes this budget a bit difficult to understand is that it also contains measures such as the expansion of publicly subsidized childcare and a 10% increase to social assistance. Those aren’t usually part of an austerity budget, but they aren’t enough to change the budget’s basic character.

Budget documents can be found at: https://www.gov.nl.ca/budget/2022/


Overview

The Deficit

The provincial deficit came in at less than half of initial projections, and the 2021-2022 deficit is better for the size of the NL economy than Saskatchewan’s and Quebec’s deficit situations. The deficit has improved because revenues were up by $400 million due to:

  1. Increased revenue from corporate taxes (especially in the iron ore sector)
  2. Increased income tax from people going back to work as the economy restarted
  3. Increased sales tax, because as prices go up due to higher inflation, the government collects higher sales tax revenue

Federal transfers helped in large measure, as they were up by $420 million in 2021-2022, due to one-time pandemic transfers and increased funding for cost-shared programs.

In 2022-2023, federal transfers will fall by $57 million, but overall revenues are expected to grow by 4.7% due to the three factors listed above. Expenditures in 2022-2023 are budgeted to grow by only 4%. Therefore, the deficit will shrink to its lowest level in a decade, at $351 million (see chart below).

It is important to understand the government’s plan for cutting expenditures over the next four years. The government plans to balance the budget deficit by cutting expenditures to 3% lower in 2026-2027 than they are in this year’s budget.

Chart

Therefore, austerity is still very much on the table, and the real reduction will be huge – 3% lower, while inflation eats into program spending by 10-15%, or more. This would result in a 13-18% cut in overall spending, since the Furey government is set on big reductions.

The debt

The debt to GDP ratio fell from 50% to 43% in one year from 2020 to 2021. The forecast for 2022-2023 is very close to Ontario’s ratio at 44%. Debt servicing takes up 7.7% of expenditures (see chart below).

Considering everything that the province has weathered, this level of debt is not more important than the social needs of the population.


Commentary

The Furey government is working from a well-worn right-wing playbook. They are trying to scare people with a crisis to justify cuts. The government is also being very careful to not raise extra revenues that will allow a balanced budget through more revenue. Right-wing parties are committed to shrinking the government and leaving the market to run society.  The problem with this is that leaving things to the market makes for very unequal outcomes for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

Right-wing governments are not really interested in balancing the budget. They use the mantra of balancing the budget as a way to reduce taxes and government spending on programs.

The Furey government could have easily eliminated the deficit this budget with a few tweaks to the plan. The first step would have been to not hand out $50 million in tax and fee cuts, raise taxes very modestly on profitable corporations, and apply extra oil revenues to the deficit. However, this wouldn’t achieve their long-term goal of shrinking the size of government.

The 2022-2023 Budget is in line with the right-wing playbook. There were no provincial tax or fee increases on corporations and top income earners. The NL Federation of Labour presented a clear list of additional revenue options that the government could pursue, however, the government decided to ignore all these suggestions.

But the spend of the economic recovery meant that the government couldn’t help but bring in more income tax and sales tax revenue.  This is an awkward problem for a government that is arguing it is broke to have.

So, the government came up with a way to not collect $50 million in vehicle registrations and home insurance.

  • Cut in vehicle registration fee from $180 to $90 on 350,000 passenger vehicles which will cost the treasury $31.5 million.
  • Waving the 15% tax on house insurance ($780 average) is a $117 reduction for each household costing $29 million.

What could $50 million get you otherwise? It could stop the $13 million in cuts to Memorial University, or use the $50 million to pay for wage increases for public sector workers.

Instead, the budget was completely quiet on wages for workers, who carried us through the pandemic and help keep the economy going.


Budget overview by CUPE sector

Community services

  • Budget announcement: “This year, a new application and assessment process will be implemented for core funding.” It is yet unclear what changes are going to be made or what the new process will emphasize.
  • Increased funding for community services by $5 million.

Education

  • The budget for K-12 education was one of the few sections that kept up with inflation. Funding went from $935 million to $971 million, an increase of 3.8%.
  • Enrolment is projected to increase by 1,000 students this year.

Early childhood education and childcare

  • $46 million to bring in $10/day childcare by the beginning of 2023 ($41 million Federal contributions).
  • Plan to create 6,000 new regulated early learning spaces by 2026.
  • $3 million to increase seats in early childhood education programs in post-secondary.
  • $400,000 to hire outside consultants to do a wage-grid analysis to inform the government’s position on what early childhood educators should be paid.

Health care and long-term care

  • Funding reduction from $3.66 billion to $3.59 billion for 2022-2023.
  • This may not seem like a big cut, but consider that health care advocates tell us that an aging population adds 1% to health care costs per year, and CPI increased by 3.7% last year.
  • The health care budget would need to increase by 4.7% this year to stand still (adjusted to $3.82 billion in funding). The missing funding between the adjusted amount and the actual funded amount this year amounts to a $242 million dollars this year.
  • $2.5 million to increase the number of seats for personal care attendant, practical nursing, and other health programs at the College of the North Atlantic. New seats are not enough, more tuition and grant supports are needed to allow workers to switch careers into health care.

NL Housing Corporation

  • Budget increases the allocation to the NL Housing Corporation by $22 million, from $120 million to $142 million.
  • Additional funding to improve housing stability and prevent homelessness. This funding comes in a range of measures, partly a funding increase to NL Housing for repairs to public housing.
  • Other amounts mentioned in the budget will be transferred to people directly to assist in paying private landlords, or for community groups operating supportive living arrangements.

Libraries

  • The Provincial Information and Library Resources Board received $11.4 million in funding in 2021-2022. This amount is only increased to $11.6 million for 2022-2023.
  • If funding had kept up with CPI, funding should have been $11.82 million for 2022-2023.

Municipalities

  • Continuation of past funding: $141 million through municipal operating grants, special assistance grants, Community Enhancement Employment Program grants, and the Canada Community Building Fund.

Post-secondary

  • Memorial University has funding cut from $319 million to $305 million, a cut of $13.6 million. Over five years, the Furey government will be cutting $68.4 million from MUN’s budget.
  • Tuition offset funding to be phased out.

Group homes, transition houses

  • Budget is silent on the needs of clients and workers in transition homes and group homes.

Download a copy of this budget analysis (PDF)